Hospital Radio in the 21st Century

Not everyone engages in today’s modern technology phenomenon where entertainment, news, family and social interactions are accessed in an instant. Society assumes that the majority of us have the means and capability to use modern communication devices (mobiles, laptops etc). However, as a ward walker for hospital radio, I know that there remains a large majority of patients who do not have this facility available to them. Many come from a generation who neither understand nor like or can afford modern devices. Those who do have mobile technology gadgets may not find them particularly easy to use in hospital. Mobile phone usage may be prohibited; the phone/data signals poor to non-existent; keeping phones charged a nightmare; Wi-Fi access unavailable or at a cost, so a longer than expected stay may prove expensive. Consequently those excluded from the mobile technology world, rely on whatever form of entertainment a hospital complex provides. That is why hospital radio still has a role to play in the 21st century. It can provide local news, cover local sports in more detail, convey personal messages and play a much wider more varied selection of music than national/commercial radio stations.

As a ward walker taking patient requests I’ve found myself in a mix of roles over the years. At times I’ve been a patient’s only visitor, other times I’ve felt more like a councillor, social worker, priest, confidante and friend. The music presenter part comes last of all. Through hospital radio a patient has a friend at the bedside, the lonely find companionship, those feeling frazzled by the demands of their illness find a reassuring calming presence and friendly voice on the radio. Having spoken to the patients before I go on air, I’m sure they feel a sense of community and belonging when they listen to me, and have a palpable sense that someone somewhere still does care about them. Speaking for myself, I know that money cannot buy the feelings I’ve experienced over the years serving the patients of Leighton Hospital. It remains an absolute privilege and pleasure helping those who are unwell, feel a little better and more comforted.

Modern technology offers connection and interaction with the world, yet maintains a clinical remoteness as well. Perhaps that’s why many users of social media still claim to experience feelings of great loneliness. By comparison, hospital radio offers an incredibly personal interaction with patients both face to face and over the airwaves. This is a priceless attribute that should be protected and nourished. Long May Hospital Radio Reign.

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